Main Studies

04. Jun. 2014 studies

LEGAL OPINION LEGAL ASSESSMENT OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION'S PROPOSAL FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICY BEYOND 2020

On January 22, 2014, the European Commission presented their proposal for a climate and energy package for 2030. However, unlike under the current Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC, there would not be any national targets for the Member States, but only this one overall target for all Member States together to reach. Without national targets, questions have arisen as to how the European Commission is going to ensure that the binding EU-level target of at least 27% renewable is in fact reached, e.g. as the European Union has no territory of its own on which to build renewable energy power plants, or what can be done if it is not reached.  

04. Jun. 2014 studies

Assessing the Greens/EFA 2030 Climate and Energy targets

Based on its Vision Scenario for 2030 and beyond (published in 2011), the Greens/EFA group in the European Parliament has revised its 2030 Climate and Energy targets. Greens/EFA aim at 40% primary energy savings (compared to 2010), a 45% share of final energy demand and 60% greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions (compared to 1990) by 2030. The new targets have been based on new insights and were intended to bring about further discussion about the 2030 targets in the European Council, the European Commission and the European Parliament.  

04. Jun. 2014 studies

Assessing the EU 2030 Climate and Energy targets

On 22 January 2014, the European Commission put forward 2030 energy and clime targets of a 40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (compared to 1990) and a share of 27% renewables in final energy consumption. This Briefing Paper contains the most important conclusions of an assessment of these targets, as analysed by Ecofys and commissioned by the Greens/EFA group in the European Parliament.  

04. Jun. 2014 studies

Review of industry statements concerning the 'adverse effects' of European climate and energy policies

European industry claims that high energy costs and prices are the result of expen- sive and exaggerated environmental policies which ultimately affects Europe‚Äôs com- petitiveness. This paper will focus on the impacts of European climate and energy policies on the European steel industry. It will take real statements made by the industry as a struc- ture, and these will be evaluated using official statistics, market figures and studies.